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2 hours I was in that dentist’s chair.

2 hours of gag reflex, 2 hours of the horrid smell of bone being drilled, 2 hours of fingers and instruments and bloodied suction hoses poking and prodding my mouth.

This post is not for the faint of heart. Friends, my molar extraction was an ORDEAL OF EPIC PROPORTIONS.

My previous Art of Contentment posts have been warm, fuzzy things like pure wool blankets, charming pottery coffee mugs and my little loves (daschunds).

Tonight, all I can focus on is that little bottle of pills by my bedside which numb the hell my mouth just went through.

Thank you Doctors and researchers and — can I go so far as to say pharmaceuticals? — thank you for pills that ease the pain.

And I have to ask, if you’re one of the people who stoically never take pills (I know you’re out there!) I honestly don’t understand — how do you *survive* these kinds of events?

Photo Credit: EssjayNZ

About the Author


Imagine if Canadians were known for being all over their money. Engaged. Proactive. Getting out of debt. Savvy. Saving. Generous. Nancy wants to help. Nancy started her own journey with money over 15 years ago, and formed her company “Your Money by Design” in 2004 to help others along the same path. It’s not the usual financial advising/investment stuff. It’s about taking control of day-to-day finances –managing monthly cashflow effectively, spending appropriately, getting out of debt, saving. If you're ready to take control over your finances, pop by her business site, YourMoneybyDesign.com

8 Comments

  1. Warren

    Here’s hoping you heal quickly!

    [Reply]

    Nancy (aka Moneycoach) Reply:

    Thanks Warren. I was so utterly naive about this. I thought I’d be chipper after in the evening and good to go in to work just like normal. Wrong! This was literally surgery.

    [Reply]

    Mar 28, 2011
  2. brad

    Ouch, that sounds like such an ordeal! I had a wisdom tooth extracted a few years ago and was able to eat a regular meal the same evening, no lingering pain, but my extraction only lasted 20 minutes or so. Yours sounds a lot more complicated.

    For some reason my dentist likes to avoid using Novacaine whenever he can get away with it (probably cuts down on time and costs), and he’s done a few fillings on me without any anaesthetic whatsoever — not a pleasant experience. It’s mainly the anticipation of pain that makes it difficult, but then in the last few minutes there is real pain; it probably feels worse than it really is because I’ve spent all that time anticipating and dreading it.

    [Reply]

    Nancy (aka Moneycoach) Reply:

    “there is real pain” are the operative words here! Sheesh – is he a secret sadist?

    [Reply]

    Mar 29, 2011
  3. Maureen

    You poor thing..when I had my wisdom teeth out (lo these many years ago!!) it was a disaster. Thank goodness for the pills. I hear you, sister!

    [Reply]

    Nancy (aka Moneycoach) Reply:

    Thanks Maureen. I’m not even trying not to be sucky about this. All sympathy gladly accepted :0

    [Reply]

    Mar 29, 2011
  4. et

    Bring an Ipod with good book or music to the dentist next time. Just make sure you won’t need to fiddle too much with it. I also ask for the rubber stoppers that you can bite down on – I find it helps a lot with the gag reflex. A good dentist helps, too.

    Hope you heal quickly.

    [Reply]

    Nancy (aka Moneycoach) Reply:

    I brought it with me and in retrospect wish I’d used it. I tried to watch the TV shows on the ceiling but I couldn’t hear it above the sounds of the drills so it wasn’t very effective. #notetoself

    [Reply]

    Mar 31, 2011

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